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This Ramadhan, children in over 200 broken homes in the UK will face poverty, isolation and fear without their fathers. Children like Hana, who at the tender age of 8, is struggling with trauma and extreme stress, following the arrest of her father.

Like all children of prisoners, she's no better off than an orphan. Hers is a grief that is akin to bereavement, but it doesn't elicit the same sympathy or support. This is Hana's third Ramadan without Baba. With your help, we can make it her first Ramadhan with HHUGS.

With every Ramadan that passes in turmoil, the unaddressed trauma of Hana's family will grow to tear its members apart. The strength of her single mother will fail in the face of on-going poverty and a lack of opportunities. Her children may succumb to mental-health problems, experience bullying and may even turn to truancy in the absence of social support.

This Ramadhan your Zakah and Sadaqah need not travel too far to lift a child like Hana out of poverty and deprivation. Those most needy of help and healing are closer than we think.

In the best month to give charity, can you give a child without Baba a Ramadan of Hope?

"One who looks after a widow or a poor person is like the one who strives in Allah’s cause or like him who performs prayers all night and fasts all day."
al-Bukhari

Another Ramadhan

- without Baba... -

Dear Baba,

The girls in my class call me ISIS girl. Zainab says not to tell Mama or she will cry. Mama cried when I asked her if we will get new Eid dresses. I heard her at night when she thought we were sleeping. Also she cried when I wet the bed. I was scared from the men banging on the door saying ‘leave this house!’ because we have no money. I was scared they would take mama too.

But I have to be strong like Zainab. The boys on the estate pulled her scarf off, and still she didn’t cry. She even gave me her fish fingers at Iftar, so that I don’t tell Mama, even though we only got two each and she was hungry from fasting. Baba, when will you come back to take us to the mosque? I watch Nasreen going for Tarawih with her baba from the window. Mama says if. I pray in Ramadhan, Allah makes our prayers come true.

In times of togetherness like Ramadhan and Eid, children of prisoners feel the pain and isolation more strongly.

For Hana, we can't change the fact that Ramadhan will never be the same without Baba. But with your support, we can help broken families like hers regain stability, confidence and hope so that healing can begin.

Be The Answer to a Child’s Prayers This Ramadhan
£50
Feed a Family
Emergency essential food pack or £250 food vouchers for the month

It's hard to imagine that a family living in the UK could face hunger and malnutrition. Yet this has been the reality for over 3000 households since 2001. With their husbands in detention due to national security measures, aggrieved wives become single mothers. They are left to pick up the pieces of a life devastated overnight. With bank accounts closed or frozen, and benefits withheld, often they haven't even the means to feed their children.

"I had saved £3000; they took that accusing us of using it for terrorism. I had £5 in my pocket, which they also took. For 3 months, when the benefits were in my husbands name, I was begging from people to give me food. Some days I had no milk to feed the children."

£150
Unite a Family
Enable a month's worth of prison visits at £50 per visit

It's hard to imagine that a family living in the UK could face hunger and malnutrition. Yet this has been the reality for over 3000 households since 2001. With their husbands in detention due to national security measures, aggrieved wives become single mothers. They are left to pick up the pieces of a life devastated overnight. With bank accounts closed or frozen, and benefits withheld, often they haven't even the means to feed their children.

"May Allah reward everyone at HHUGS for arranging transport for the prison visit. Alhamdulillah, if it was not for HHUGS and the volunteers who drive us, I wouldn't be able to do this, especially with a new born baby. […] My husband was so excited about seeing our son, it was the first time he’d seen him since he's been born."

£200
Heal a Family
Professional counselling to help mothers and children or £50 per session


Families of prisoners are more than twice as likely to suffer mental health problems due to loneliness, isolation and grief. Most suffer from the trauma of having witnessed raids and arrests. Children in families impacted by national security measures are forced to tackle conflicting emotions before they're old enough to understand them. They live with the shame of psychological responses like bedwetting, and have trouble expressing their pain. They struggle to ‘be strong’ in support of a mother who is struggling with her own share of trauma and anxiety, along with the burden of caring for her family alone.

"I began constantly living in fear. I started feeling that I’m not a complete human being, the pressure on me was very intense, all of my hair fell out. I couldn’t control my emotions and would burst out crying all of the time. I feel my mind has gone. I don’t even have the means to laugh anymore or speak normally, like I used to."

£500
Shelter a Family
Cover the cost of rent, basic utilities & essential repairs

Following an arrest, families impacted by counter-terror legislation often have their assets confiscated. Many are left without the means to pay the rent or even repair a front door broken in a raid. In most cases, they face eviction and constant harassment by bailiffs. Unable to pay utility bills, they are forced to go without sufficient heating and electricity, and are often left exposed to the elements in their own homes. With smashed doors in disrepair, they're left vulnerable without the most basic security.

"[…] I didn’t have anything for rent or food. It wasn’t legal for me to work. Eventually, the council gave us a house but they wanted me to pay for the rent, the bills but I had no income. I was very depressed. HHUGS were paying for my bills and my rent. I think if HHUGS were not there I wouldn’t be alive right now"

£500
Empower
Help single mothers gain independence, through vocational training


Following the arrest of their husbands, wives of prisoners become single mothers overnight. They are hurled into the role of primary bread-winner in the aftermath of a devastating blow. Through financial hardship and social isolation, they struggle to provide and care for their children. Many face the additional challenge of language constraints as well as a lack of basic skills and work experience. Without community support for childcare and funding for education, they're unable to improve their situation. Their association with someone investigated on charges of terrorism, also reduces their opportunities and chances of employment.

"When I came here, I told my husband to speak to me in English, but he didn't teach it to me. When he got arrested, I had no idea about anything, even the road names. I didn't know how to take money out of a cash machine, or that I should hide my pin. If I knew English, everything would have become easy for me.


A Ramadhan with HHUGS

Dear Baba,

Mama laughed at Suhoor time because Zainab squirted water at me when we brushed our teeth. Mama doesn’t cry so much at night any more. When the HHUGS Aunty brought food for us, she also brought vouchers. Mama got me a new Eid dress with them! I’ll wear it soon. The aunty will take us to an Eid party where there are other children whose Babas are in prison too. Mama said we can make friends there.

You know, I fasted today with Zainab and Mama until lunchtime! Mama gave me a chocolate brownie because I fasted. She could buy it with the vouchers that the HHUGS Aunty gave. But I saved half my brownie to give to Zainab at Iftar. She was so happy. Do you have brownies in prison? I will bring you my brownie from my next fast when the HHUGS Uncles take us to see you on Eid. Mama was right, Allah makes our prayers come true in Ramadhan.

With your support, we can embrace broken families and help them regain dignity, confidence and hope so that healing can begin.
£10
Gifts of Joy
Gift Eid presents to children who won't be getting new clothes this Eid

New clothes, gifts and the joy of celebrating together –these are the things all children look forward to at the end of Ramadhan. But for children of prisoners, the poverty, fear and isolation don't pause for Eid. Theirs are households where food is scarce, and many are forced to go without warm clothes in winter, let alone new ones for the holidays. When they outgrow shoes or school uniforms, their mothers struggle to afford new ones.

" The children began to feel special after receiving Eid gifts from HHUGS and they also arranged Eid parties we could attend. We finally started to feel more normal, like there were some people who weren’t afraid to associate with us. HHUGS saw us as human beings, not as criminals and terrorists. They treated us as part of the Ummah."

£10
Connect Families
Give isolated families a chance to Connect with others this Eid

Isolation is hard to bear at the best of times, so no one deserves to be left alone in times of hardship. Yet this is the reality families of prisoners live with day in and day out. Labelled guilty by association, they are ostracised by their own communities, and often face harassment. This situation is often hardest on the children who witness the joy of their peers. While other families and friends come together in celebration this Eid, their hurt and loneliness will be that much harder to bear.

" The children felt special after receiving Eid gifts from HHUGS and attending their Eid parties. We finally started to feel more normal, like there were some people who weren’t afraid to associate with us. HHUGS saw us as human beings, not as criminals. They treated us as part of the Ummah."

£10
Cherish a Child
Cherish a child through the guidance and support of a HHUGS mentor for 6 months

Children of prisoners are bullied and ostracised. They are forced to live with trauma and tackle conflicting emotions before they're old enough to understand them. They struggle to ‘be strong’ in support of a mother who is struggling with her own share of trauma and anxiety. Made to feel guilty by association, children of prisoners often submit to mental-health problems and even turn to truancy in the absence of social support. They are more than three times as likely to commit anti-social or delinquent behaviour, with two thirds of boys with a convicted parent becoming offenders themselves.

"It impacted my education so that I actually failed my GCSEs…I failed everything"

Thank you